Sunday Sales Blast 10/5/14

Ebola, is it coming?

Being in the sanitary supply industry we are expected to know procedures and products that are effective to control what the press is saying will eventually hit the US and other parts of the world, the Ebola outbreak!

We thought it would be a good time to put together links to facts and information on the current state of Ebola and what we should be doing about it in this issue of the Sunday Sales Blast. Feel fee to pass on this email and or the links to the specific articles when you get questions. You can also send people to the link for the Bullen Blog- 

Ebola Case in U.S. Draws Calls for Calm From Officials

Top federal health officials, seeking to calm a nervous public, ruled out Friday the possibility of an Ebola outbreak in the U.S., as Texas officials moved to contain the first case of the deadly virus diagnosed in America.

“There were things that did not go the way they should have in Dallas,” he said, but added that the U.S. health-care infrastructure should “stop Ebola in its tracks.”  That isn’t particularly reassuring is it?

Here is the link for the full article:

http://online.wsj.com/articles/dallas-hospital-says-didnt-first-admit-ebola-patient-due-to-glitch-1412347096?mod=WSJ_hppMIDDLENexttoWhatsNewsSecond

Some key questions and answers from the Well of the NY Times

How long does the Ebola virus live on contaminated surfaces, such as bed sheets, door knobs, etc.?

It’s different in every set of circumstances. The Ebola virus eventually dries out in the air and dies. It’s not like anthrax, which forms a hard capsule around itself and can survive for months or a year. Ebola is a virus that is meant to live inside blood or fluid in your cells. It’s not meant to live in the open air, so it dies.

Can I get Ebola from public transportation? As in, if a passenger coughed into their hand and then held onto the pole, and then another passenger held onto that pole and inadvertently wiped their eye?

The answer is no. Someone with Ebola is really, really sick. They’re seeking hospital care. It is unlikely they are riding the bus. They are not going to work. The virus is spread by bodily fluid contact: by blood, by vomit. When it’s being spread by sweat or urine, you’re practically at the dead body stage. So it’s not transmitted the way that colds could be, by touching a pole in a subway or bus.

How long does the Ebola virus live on contaminated surfaces, such as bed sheets, door knobs, etc.?

It’s different in every set of circumstances. The Ebola virus eventually dries out in the air and dies. It’s not like anthrax, which forms a hard capsule around itself and can survive for months or a year. Ebola is a virus that is meant to live inside blood or fluid in your cells. It’s not meant to live in the open air, so it dies.

Here is the link to the flu list of questions and answers

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/03/ebola-ask-well-spread-public-transit/?_php=true&_type=blogs&hp&_r=0

Here is a great question from the CDC site:

Why do responders in Africa wear so much personal protective equipment (that can include full body suits) for this Ebola outbreak when CDC says hospitals here could safely manage the care of an Ebola patient without a full body suit?

There are important differences between providing care or performing public health tasks in Africa versus in a U.S. hospital.

In field medical settings, additional PPE may be necessary to protect healthcare workers. In some places in Africa, workers may not have the ability to prepare for potential exposures. For example, in some places, care may be provided in clinics with limited resources (e.g., no running water, no climate control, no floors, inadequate medical supplies), and workers could be in those areas for several hours with a number of Ebola infected patients. Additionally, certain job responsibilities and tasks, such as attending to dead bodies, may also require different PPE than what is used when providing care for infected patients in a hospital.

For the latest from the CDC you can go to this link:

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/

10 Worst Outbreaks in U.S. History

Want some more? Here is a listing of the worst ones in US History, click the below:

http://www.healthline.com/health/worst-disease-outbreaks-history#Overview1

I think that is enough doom and gloom for today. Lets all settle back and watch some football. Eagles against the Rams at 1:00.

Have a great day and an even better sales week!

Scott Jarden

President