Sunday Sales Blast 1/11/15

Winter is definitely here!

With temperatures of 8 degrees (when I started writing this weeks SSB) here at Bullen central we can say winter has arrived.

Good news though, we have not had much snow as compared to last year and it will be spring in 68 days. If you want to keep track of in down to the hours, minutes and seconds here is a link for a website that does just that:

 

http://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/generic?iso=20150320T09&p0=414&msg=PARCC+First+Spring+test

Spring is time to try new finishes and re-coating winter damaged floors

With spring coming that also means that floors will need new coats of finish. Bullen was just awarded another year (third so far) with a major school system for our EPA DfE approved floor care program under the e-clean brand. This particular school district has 160 buildings and the e-clean Floor Finish has proven itself and it’s “no strip promise”. If you would like to learn more about the products here is the link: 

http://www.e-cleanproducts.com/products/#e-clean-floor-finish


You can request samples for floor testing now to be ready for the next bid season awards.

Speaking of cold, rhinoviruse is hiding in your nose


If there is a champion among contagions, it may well be the lowly rhinovirus, responsible for many of the coughs and sniffles that trouble us this time of year. Rhinoviruses are spectacularly effective at infecting humans. Americans suffer one billion colds a year, and rhinoviruses are the leading cause of these infections.

Scientists have never been sure why they are so effective, but now a team at Yale University may have found a clue. The scientists argue that rhinoviruses have found a blind spot in the human immune system: They take advantage of the cold air in our noses.

In the 1960s, researchers first noticed that if they incubated rhinoviruses a few degrees below body temperature, the viruses multiplied much faster. It was an intriguing finding, since rhinoviruses often infect the lining of the nostrils, which are cooled by incoming air.

What does this mean for us not in the lab? If lower temperatures help the rhinovirus survive then I think we need to move to areas that don’t get cold, like Florida….. just seems like a good idea. For the full article use this link:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/13/health/unraveling-the-key-to-a-cold-viruss-effectiveness.html?hp

Great football last night with New England coming back against a strong Baltimore and the Seahawks showing they could repeat. Todays games could be just as good (as long as the Cowboys lose).

Have a great day and an even better sales week!

Scott Jarden