Sunday Sales Blast 9/11/17

Off to the ISSA show!

We are traveling today to do booth setup for the ISSA show so no SSB this week. Stay tuned for video coverage from our booth all week.

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Only 2 days till the ISSA show starts, are you coming? See us in booth #2537 or watch our videos from the booth each day.

If you are coming to the show and flying check this info from last weeks SSB.


Come flu with me

The way airlines board planes affects how easily bugs are spread among passengers.

IT IS an often-heard office conversation. Someone returns from a trip with a nasty bug, and colleagues say he must have caught it from a germ-ridden plane. It is not unusual to come down with something nasty after flying. And as a fellow Gulliver reported last week, contaminated air on flights is widespread.

Someone has to carry those bugs into the cabin in the first place, before infecting fellow flyers. Researchers at Arizona State University, Florida State University and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University have found that the way airlines board planes can have a huge effect on the potential for disease contagion. The researchers considered a hypothetical outbreak of the Ebola virus and the effect that different boarding methods could have on infection rates. With the standard boarding method of dividing the plane into three sections and boarding passengers from front to back, there is a 67% chance of reaching 20 or more air travel-related cases of Ebola per month, as passengers cluster together while waiting for the earlier boarders to stow their bags. It would be far better, the researchers found, to split the plane into two sections and board randomly within each section. In this scenario, the risk of infecting 20 people per month drops to 40%. (It would probably also make boarding quicker.)

For the full article to make you even more uncomfortable flying click this link:
https://www.economist.com/blogs/gulliver/2017/08/come-flu-me


Have a great day and an even better sales week!

Scott Jarden